Laurie Amat & Mirek Vodrážka (USA/CZ)

http://www.myspace.com/laurieamat

Laurie Amat has been called “The Voice on Everyone’s Lips”. She explores the broad possibilities of voice, breath and body in live performance, recording and multimedia. Ms. Amat’s approach to singing has always stemmed from the power of the voice as an instrument which conveys natural human emotion. The result is a visceral and sensual exploration, which continually challenges boundaries.

Mirek Vodrazka is an experimental musician, chaos theorist, independent journalist and political activist. In nineties he was one of the few men in the media, opening a feminist and transgender discussion. He has been the author of numerous studies, articles, lectures, publications editor of gender and gender research collaborator.


AN EMOTIONALIST MANIFESTO

A project by singer Laurie Amat and pianist Mirek Vodrážka

We engrave emotions – a spiritual movement - into music as a sentient state marked by dynamic elements. Emotional music with its mental substance is a derivate of instinctive stimuli. A person can only realize his or hers being through emotions similarly to an awoken dream of human unconscious.
An Emotionalist Manifesto, 1971

In general, emotions tend to have a bad name and an inferior position in Western society. That is why they were destined to stand on the stake of disdainful insignificance, inarticulacy and irrationality. Modern Cartesian thinking based upon the dichotomy of consciousness and the body also facilitated the scientific subordination of emotions perceived as a product of destitute conditions of early evolution and persistantly linked to unstable emotional disturbances (such as anger, sadness, fear, happiness, etc).

Emotions have been stigmatized as a consequence of the inferior order of humanity, linked to mental turmoil, negatively viewed in connection with physical movement, peristalsis and orgasm or described through unreasonable and erratic symbols of feminity. On the other hand, they have become part of the directed feelings inherent in the film industry and the fluff in globalized media >>